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first_imgThe Nieman Foundation for Journalism at Harvard and the Pulitzer Center on Crisis Reporting have joined forces to support international reporting initiatives with a special focus on global health coverage.The partnership will also bring Pulitzer Center journalists to Harvard University for presentations and discussions on underreported international stories and provide an annual workshop for Nieman Fellows that will explore the Center’s innovative strategies for using multimedia platforms effectively; placing news stories in the media for maximum impact; and employing social media, educational networks and other techniques to engage the public in important global issues.The new collaboration grows out of the Nieman Foundation’s specialized fellowship in global health reporting, which was launched at Harvard in 2006 and includes a four-month reporting project at the end of the academic year.The Nieman Global Health Reporting Fellowship is a unique addition to Harvard’s global health related research, education and engagement programs. Harvard is currently the only university in the world that, through this kind of fellowship, includes journalistic inquiry and storytelling in its efforts to comprehensively recognize, study and address global health issues.“This new venture will benefit not only Nieman Global Health Fellows but many other reporters covering international events and issues,” explains Nieman Foundation curator Bob Giles. “We are grateful for the support of the Pulitzer Center and we are looking forward to working together to help shine a spotlight on topics that are too often neglected by the media today.”“The Nieman Foundation has for decades been a leading voice for the importance of high-quality reporting,” adds Jon Sawyer, the Pulitzer Center’s executive director. “We are honored to work with our colleagues there as together we explore how to sustain that vision at a time of profound change in the way journalism is produced and consumed.”Around campus, Nieman Fellows learns from experts in the field and offer journalistic insight and their reporting experience to classroom discussions, projects and conversations. Once they have embarked on their fieldwork projects, the fellows bring insightful, comprehensive global health reporting back to their audiences.“The global community is devoting more resources to understanding and resolving health issues than we have ever seen,” says Stefanie Friedhoff, special projects manager at the Nieman Foundation, who directs the global health fellowship. “This is a remarkable process of interdepartmental, interdisciplinary, intercultural and international collaboration. As with all democratic activity, journalists are essential in this process as they chronicle what is happening on all levels; and explain to audiences why programs are designed the way they are, how people are affected or why financial commitments matter. Journalists also provide the checks and balances needed to identify unintended consequences, uncover abuses and support the global community in spotting and addressing what is not working as quickly as possible.”A recent example of reporting on a pressing global health issue that has had an impact is a series by Margie Mason, a 2009 Nieman Global Health Reporting Fellow, and her Associated Press colleague Martha Mendoza called “When Drugs Stop Working.” The two reporters traveled to four continents to report on the alarming growth in drug-resistant diseases and show how drug resistance is a global, not a local threat. Margie Mason’s research at Harvard led her to discover the first U.S. case of extremely drug-resistant tuberculosis in the United States, which became a major element of the series. Mason and Mendoza won a Science in Society Journalism Award for this work.Other Nieman Global Health Reporting Fellows have focused on topics such as innovative mental health interventions in India, the brain drain of health workers from the developing to the developed world, and the people who participate in AIDS vaccine trials, ranging from a lawyer in San Francisco to a mother of four in Tanzania.However, due to the many recent changes affecting journalism and international reporting in particular, placing such stories in mainstream media outlets is becoming increasingly difficult.“It is not just about providing the financial resources journalists need to travel and stay with a project for more than two weeks, which has become impossible for most newsrooms,” says Friedhoff. “Sorting through the many dimensions of global health stories is daunting and finding narratives that make the complexities accessible to the general public, especially when connecting a far-away health crisis with our own lives in the developed world, takes time and training.“The Nieman program has been able to produce some remarkable examples of global health reporting. The resources available at Harvard and in Boston provide the proverbial ‘world in a nutshell’ when it comes to opportunities to focus on global health, from cutting-edge research to policy debates to implementation. We are looking forward to increasing our reporting output and impact in this new collaboration with the Pulitzer Center, and to learn from the Center’s innovative ways of creating community around a subject of concern, both online and through outreach events.”The new partnership between Nieman and Pulitzer is reflected in the Fall 2010 issue of Nieman Reports, with articles by Pulitzer Center Executive director Jon Sawyer (“The Sometimes Bumpy Nonprofit Ride Into Digital Foreign Correspondence”) as well as journalists funded by the Pulitzer Center, Kwame Dawes (“Bearing Witness: The Poet as Journalist”), Jason Motlagh (“From War Zones to Life at Home: Serendipity and Partners Matter”), and Fatima Tlisova, a 2009 Nieman Fellow, (“Brutal Censorship: Targeting Russian Journalists”). Nieman Reports is serving as the publishing partner for Tlisova’s reporting about Russian journalists who have fled the country or have been killed.Based in Washington, D.C., the Pulitzer Center promotes, funds and publishes international reporting projects and has built a reputation as an innovator in keeping global affairs on local radar screens. In collaboration with the Nieman Foundation, the Center’s staff will help Nieman Global Health Fellows with story planning and placement. The fellows will also be included in the Center’s outreach program.The new partnership is underwritten by a grant from the Pulitzer Center, which will cover the cost of the fieldwork for 2011 Nieman Global Health Fellows Antigone Barton and Helen Branswell as well as for their counterparts in 2012 and 2013.last_img read more


first_img Presidential Public Service Fellowship has broad reach Can hashtag movements or Twitter bot text be considered poetry? How can we conduct and present research through art? What is immersive storytelling?The inaugural group of Harvard College Fellows in Media Practice are tackling these questions and more in their research, teaching, and art on campus. Poet Margaret Rhee, artist and writer Sohin Hwang, and Young Joo Lee, a visual and performance artist, are exploring the interplay of technology and art in the arts and humanities, and encouraging Harvard students to do the same.As part of their fellowship requirements, all three artists developed new courses that emphasize art practice as a way to engage with academic concepts taught within their host departments on campus. Rhee, an assistant professor of media study at SUNY Buffalo, is working out of the Department of English. Lee is working with concentrators in Theater, Dance & Media, and Hwang is teaching and practicing in the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies.“It was exciting to think about what it meant to build new media studies that were very arts-centered at Harvard while being housed in English,” said Rhee. “My students are really excited about the intersection of literature and media, and [they] have many pressing political questions.”In Rhee’s classes “Machine Dreams” and “Poetry Machines,” students worked together and individually to produce creative works including podcasts, videos, and poems, guided by literature. “I’m really proud to see the creative risks they take, inspired by the material we’re reading,” she said.For Lee, the Theater, Dance & Media concentration is an ideal home for her work in virtual reality and interdisciplinary art. Lee required students to engage with film, animation, and virtual reality in her courses “Immersive Storytelling Using Mixed Media” in the fall and “Tools for Virtual and Real Perceptions” in the spring. In an assignment for her spring course, students worked in pairs on a project in which one partner acted as a storyteller and the other as a listener. Together, each group created a visual representation of the listener’s interpretation of the storyteller’s experience.“I wanted the students to have the experience of collaboration,” said Lee. “It’s hard to commit so much time to artistic projects while fulfilling other academic requirements, but from the work and the sincerity that the students brought to the class, [it’s clear] people are very much engaged and are excited to make something.”In the Department of Visual and Environmental Studies, Hwang was pleased by the breadth of her students’ academic backgrounds — including mechanical engineering, anthropology, and history and literature — in her courses “Artistic Research Workshop” and “Algorithmic Performance.” In both classes, Hwang focused on teaching artistic language and methods for exploring students’ research questions for art practice and scholarship.“When I teach art, the most important thing is to let the students actually experience artwork in reality through their senses and through their bodies,” said Hwang. “It’s really fun to teach students who are new to art but who are familiar with numbers, logic, and programming. They were very hungry to do something experimental with programming languages without being too concerned with problem-solving and efficiency. Making art, they set their own problems and questions and see the bodily impact of their codes.”In addition to teaching, the fellows also work on their own creative projects. Rhee is writing an academic book project solicited by MIT and Duke University Press, focusing on the relationship between robots and racialization, titled “How We Became Human: Race, Robots, and the Asian American Body.” Hwang’s latest performance and video installation piece is focused on the disconnect between planning a technological system and executing its design, and Lee is designing a virtual border wall between the U.S. and Mexico that reinterprets preconceived notions of security and policing.“We are living through a technological revolution, which is opening up dynamic new forms of research, scholarship, and communication,” said Robin Kelsey, dean of arts and humanities. “All three fellows have proven to be excellent teachers, creative practitioners, and wonderful colleagues, each contributing to our programs in a distinctive way.” Two from Harvard win prestigious fellowship Golowich, Atanasov will receive Hertz award Supports all facets of public service, from arts to human rights In the spirit of cooperation, Rhee, Lee, and Hwang found time to collaborate with one another and share their work with the Harvard community. In February, the group worked with Kelsey to organize the inaugural Humanities and New Media Lecture on campus, featuring Ken Goldberg, an artist and the William S. Floyd Distinguished Professor of Engineering at University of California, Berkeley. In April, they delivered a joint lecture titled “Mediators,” hosted by the student group Korea GSD.“The Media Practice Fellows have been a terrific addition to our community this year,” said Kelsey. “Faculty and students have been telling me what a difference they have made, and I think the program is a powerful model for the future of media practice and other emergent modes of scholarly pursuit.” Relatedlast_img read more


first_img U.S. Assistant Secretary of State for the Bureau of International Narcotics and Law Enforcement Affairs David Johnson, on a visit to Guatemala, asked the country’s authorities on 19 October for greater state investment in the fight against organized crime, especially drug trafficking and youth gangs. “The United States and the international community are active partners with Guatemala in the fight against organized crime, but the Guatemalan government should also finance the security sectors” in order to counteract these plagues, the official affirmed at a press conference. He explained that this investment should be accompanied by “transparency” in order for its results to be perceptible among the population. “The United States is committed to working with Central America and Guatemala in order to fight corruption and organized crime through the security services and the rule of law,” he maintained. Johnson recalled that the United States gave Guatemala 25 million dollars this year to support the country’s programs in the security field. These programs include strengthening security at ports and airports, monitoring the country’s air space, and supporting police and prosecutors, as well as creating model police precincts in the southern municipalities of Mixco and Villa Nueva, located on the outskirts of the capital. The American representative met in private with the attorney-general, María Mejía, and with the Guatemalan interior minister, Carlos Menocal, and visited the Congress. In addition, he planned to meet with the head of the International Commission against Impunity in Guatemala (Cicig), the Costa Rican Francisco Dall’Anese. The Cicig is a UN body that supports the rehabilitation of the Guatemalan judicial system and to which the United States has contributed 12 million dollars since it began to function in 2007. By Dialogo October 22, 2010last_img read more


first_img Disciplinary Actions August 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actions The Florida Supreme Court in recent court orders suspended 10 attorneys, disbarred six, placed three on probation, and reprimanded two attorneys.The following lawyers are disciplined: Nathan Adler, 8695 College Pkwy., Ste. 112, Ft. Myers, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a May 27 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1996) Adler failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; neglected to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; failed to explain a matter to the extent reasonably necessary to permit the client to make informed decisions regarding the representation; and violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so, or did so through the acts of another. (Case no. SC04-401) Howard I. Alabaster, 9600 W. Sample Road, Ste. 507, Coral Springs, suspended from practicing law in Florida for one year, effective immediately following a May 20 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1979) Upon termination of representation, Alabaster failed to take steps to the extent reasonably practicable to protect a client’s interest. (Case no. SC03-1559) Alan Lowell Arons, 1701 W. Hillsboro Blvd., Ste. 303, Deerfield Beach, suspended on emergency basis from practicing law in Florida until further court order, effective 30 days following an April 13 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1977) A review of Arons’ trust account revealed that there is clear, convincing, and undeniable evidence that he misappropriated client and third party funds. (Case no. SC04-601) J. Reeve Bright, 135 S.E. 5th Ave., Ste. 2, Delray Beach, probation extended for an additional two years, effective retroactive to Jan. 1, following an April 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1981) Bright failed to comply with the terms and conditions of his probation and violated the April 26, 2001, court order. (Case no. SC02-1914) Rhett Pendelton Dove III, P.O. Box 110723, Miami, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following an April 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1986) Among several Bar violations, Dove neglected to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation. (Case no. SC03-1719) Mark S. Fisch, 4400 PGA Blvd., Ste. 700, Palm Beach Gardens, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 90 days, effective 30 days following an April 15 court order. Fisch is further placed on probation for two years. (Admitted to practice: 1996) Among several Bar violations, Fisch violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so, or did so through the acts of another; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-1278) Albert Gavin-Wayne Gill, 200 Congress Park Drive, Ste. 210, Delray Beach, reprimanded for professional misconduct following a May 27 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1992) Among several Bar violations, Gill made a false, misleading, deceptive, or unfair communication about himself or his services and failed to comply with Florida Bar advertising rules. (Case no. SC04-175) Leonardo Jorge Guerra, 2140 W. 68th St., Ste. 200, Hialeah, suspended on emergency basis from practicing law in Florida until further court order, effective June 8, following an April 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1998) A review of Guerra’s trust account revealed that there is clear, convincing, and undeniable evidence that he misappropriated clients’ funds. (Case no. SC04-570) Thomas Lemuel Hurst, 2900 S.W. 28th Terrace, #700, Miami, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 90 days, effective Aug. 2, following an April 1 court order. Hurst is further placed on probation for one year. ( Admitted to practice: 1972) Hurst failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; neglected to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case no. SC03-1830) Javier Enrique Lopera, 2525 S.W. 27th Ave., Ste. 300, Coconut Grove, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following a May 20 court order ( Admitted to practice: 1993) Among several Bar violations, Lopera committed a criminal act that reflects adversely on the lawyer’s honesty, trustworthiness, or fitness as a lawyer; engaged in criminal misconduct; and violated or attempted to violate the Rules of Professional Conduct, knowingly assisted or induced another to do so, or did so through the acts of another. (Case no. SC03-1754) Gregory A. Meeks II, 37 N. Orange Ave., Ste. 500, Orlando, placed on supervised probation for one year, effective immediately following a May 20 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 2001) Meeks engaged in conduct in connection with the practice of law that is prejudicial to the administration of justice; failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct; and committed an act that was unlawful or contrary to honesty and justice. (Case no. SC03-1812) Jon Alex Merkle, 1450 Atlantic Shores Blvd., Ste. 310, Hallandale, suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following an April 12 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1999) On or about Feb. 10, Merkle was convicted of a felony by the 17th Judicial Circuit Court, and was sentenced to nine months in the Broward County Jail. (Case no. SC04-551) Martin Joseph Mickler, 2220 Riverplace Tower, Jacksonville, suspended from practicing law in Florida for 91 days, effective 30 days following a May 20 court order. If reinstated, Mickler will be placed on probation for two years. ( Admitted to practice: 1970) Among several Bar violations, Mickler failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and failed to make reasonable efforts to expedite litigation consistent with the interests of the client. (Case no. SC03-899) Robert Elliot Miller, 19305 Bakers Run Court , Brookeville, Md., suspended from practicing law in Florida for six months, effective 30 days following an April 8 court order. (Admitted to practice : 1982) Among several Bar violations, Miller failed to provide competent representation to a client; neglected to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client; and failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information. (Case no. SC03-1164) Samuel A. Mones, 407 Lincoln Road, Ste. 2A, Miami Beach, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following an April 15 court order.( Admitted to practice: 1981) Among several Bar violations, Mones failed to provide competent representation to a client; failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency when conducting an investigation into his conduct; and neglected to act with reasonable diligence and promptness in representing a client. (Case no. SC03-1621) Warner Smith Olds, 6000 N. Ocean Blvd., Apt. 9H, Ft. Lauderdale, suspended from practicing law in Florida for three years, effective retroactive to March 5, 2003, following an April 22 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1967) On or about March 5, 2003, Olds was convicted of four counts of mail fraud and one count of wire fraud and was sentenced to three years probation and 300 hours of community service. (Case no. SC03-1700) Carlton Riley Reichert, P.O. Box 616277, Orlando, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following an April 8 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1968) Among several Bar violations, Reichert charged an illegal, prohibited, or clearly excessive fee; knowingly made a false statement of a material fact to a tribunal; engaged in conduct involving dishonesty, fraud, deceit, or misrepresentation; and failed to maintain minimum trust accounting records. (Case no SC03-1628) Barry R. Shapiro, 154A Hicks St., Brooklyn, N.Y., permanently disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following an April 29 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1971) Shapiro continued to hold himself out as a Florida attorney after the effective date of his 1984 disbarment. (Case no. SC03-1317) Taryn Xenia Temmer, 1106 N. Parsons Ave., Brandon, probation extended until March 26, 2007, following an April 29 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1988) As a condition of her probation, Temmer must contact Florida Lawyers Assistance, Inc. (Case no. SC03-1222) George Guyer Young III, 1001 E. Darby Road, Harvertown, Pa., suspended from practicing law in Florida, effective 30 days following an April 15 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1988) On Feb. 12, Young plead guilty to nine counts of mail fraud, nine counts of making false statements, and three counts of theft of government funds and was sentenced to 14 months in prison. (Case no. SC04-576) Gary J. Yudewitz, 1900 W. Commercial Blvd., #100, Ft. Lauderdale, disbarred from practicing law in Florida, effective immediately following an April 15 court order. ( Admitted to practice: 1995) Among several Bar violations, Yudewitz engaged in practicing law while delinquent in his continuing legal education requirements; failed to keep a client reasonably informed about the status of a matter and promptly comply with reasonable requests for information; and failed to respond, in writing, to an official inquiry by Bar counsel or a disciplinary agency, when conducting an investigation into his conduct. (Case nos. SC03-63 and SC03-1428) Court orders are not final until time expires to file a rehearing motion and, if filed, determined. The filing of such a motion does not alter the effective date of the discipline.center_img August 15, 2004 Disciplinary Actionslast_img read more


first_img 2SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Luis A. Valdez-Jimenez “Luis A. Valdez-Jimenez has served on the Board of Directors for 360 Federal Credit Union in Windsor Locks, Connecticut since 2018. Valdez-Jimenez is passionate about increasing diversity in credit union … Web: https://www.360fcu.org Details As our communities become more diverse and connected to global commerce, credit unions will need to ensure they leverage their language skills to remain competitive. Languages are not a “nice-to-have” skill, but an absolute necessity in order to succeed in diverse markets and reduce risks associated with language miscommunication. Languages will be among the most important skills for many credit unions to develop in our changing economy.While the United States has historically focused on just speaking English, multilingualism is growing rapidly. From 1980 through 2018, the percentage of bilingual Americans nearly doubled, from about 10.68% to about 20.55%. One factor that could explain this is the fact that the United States is generally becoming more diverse. For example, since 2000 the population of more than 109 American counties have become majority non-white. However, another potential explanation is the realization that bilingualism, even if English is one’s native language, brings enormous benefits to an ever increasingly globalized economy. The New American Economy think tank produced a study showing that demand for bilingual workers has more than doubled in five years, including for both low and high skill positions. Studies in Europe have illustrated the macro-economic impacts of speaking foreign languages. Switzerland estimates that 10% of its GDP is generated from its multilingual skills, while the UK estimates that lack of multilingual skills costs it over 3.5% of its GDP.Credit unions are the perfect examples of institutions that need to develop language skills. Credit unions offer complex products and services to consumers in order to help them achieve their financial goals. Credit unions are focused on serving their communities and members, not shareholders. As our communities become more linguistically diverse, credit unions need to be able to effectively communicate their value in the languages spoken by their members. The large banking institutions understand the value of languages, as the New American Economy report showed that more than a third of Bank of America’s job postings online required bilingual skills.There are enormous benefits for credit unions to reach into multilingual markets. I grew up in a majority Latino community and both of my parents are Latin American immigrants whose first language is Spanish. Firms that could not effectively communicate their value or serve their customers in Spanish did not do well in my community. Minority communities are growing significantly in spending power. The American Hispanic community has a spending power of over $1.4 Trillion USD, the African American community with over $1.2 Trillion USD, and the Asian American community at over $891 Billion USD.The Immigrant communities in general are underserved by financial institutions. The Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation reports in 2017 that Latino, African American, and immigrant communities have higher percentages of members being unbanked or underbanked than the overall American population. As the spending power of these communities grow, these markets will only become more lucrative for credit unions.Ineffective language skills are a major risk to firms and credit unions.  The United States Committee on Economic Development estimates language and cultural misunderstandings cost American businesses over $2 billion dollars per year. Due to the complex nature of financial products and services and the potential detriment they can cause if mismanaged, financial institutions have been held accountable for not providing adequate language services to those who don’t speak English. Wells Fargo was accused of not providing Spanish speaking loan officers and taking advantage of Spanish speaking borrowers by steering them to more expensive and higher risk loans.So how do credit unions effectively leverage their language skills to achieve the benefits I mentioned above? There are numerous ways to do so, so let’s go over some briefly. While credit unions can contract for translating services, they are often expensive options that may not provide the flexibility credit unions need. Instead, I suggest credit unions hire multilingual staff to serve their customers who don’t speak English. How do you know your staff is fluent enough for these important and complex products and services? I recommend ensuring your staff obtain language proficiency credentials. For example, Language Testing International offers language certifications based on criteria developed by The American Council on the Teaching of Foreign Languages that is widely recognized and respected. For more information on Language Testing International, see this link.Leveraging language skills will benefit credit unions by being better able to serve their customers, grow into multilingual markets, and reduce their language communication risks. Credit unions should not ignore the importance of language skills if they don’t want to be left behind by their competition.last_img read more


first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A mother and her 11-month-old son were held hostage for five days last week before they escaped a harrowing kidnapping in which the young mom was stabbed, whipped with an electrical cord, and threatened at gunpoint, Nassau County police said.Their alleged kidnappers were identified as 20-year-old Malachi Blaylock, the child’s father, whom the woman has an order of protection against, and the tot’s grandmother, 51-year-old Yolanda Gilreath, police said. Both were charged with kidnapping, among other disturbing charges, and were arrested Monday night, one day after the victim had contacted Rockville Centre Village police.The 20-year-old mother was hospitalized in Brooklyn on Saturday, police said. The child was unharmed during the “horrific” ordeal, said Nassau County police Insp. Kenneth Lack Tuesday at a press conference at police headquarters in Mineola.Despite the order of protection against Blaylock, the woman traveled to Gilreath’s apartment on Old Mill Court in Rockville Centre at 1 p.m. on Monday, July 20, after being cajoled into visiting, Lack said. They were moved to an apartment in Hempstead on Wednesday, and escaped captivity two days later, police recounted.“They were lured by the mother via text message that the grandmother wanted to see the grandchild,” Lack said.Upon arriving, Blaylock allegedly grabbed the toddler out of his mother’s arms and ordered the woman into his bedroom.After handing the child off to Gilreath, Blaylock allegedly pushed the mother of his child to the ground, yelled at her, and punched her in the face and body, police said.The violence didn’t end there, police said.“She was beaten repeatedly during the five days,” Lack said. “She was strangled. She had injuries all over her body—contusions, lacerations. She was beaten with an electrical cord; she was stabbed in the hand with scissors. It was a horrific experience.”At one point Gilreath appeared to intervene, reacting to the woman’s screams by calling Blaylock’s sister. The sister, who was not identified, saw the woman’s condition and attempted to dial 911 but was stopped when Blaylock allegedly knocked the phone out of her hand, Lack said. That was the only attempt made by anyone on hand to alert the authorities.Blaylock allegedly moved the woman and child to an apartment in Hempstead on Wednesday, July 22, for unknown reasons. As of Friday, the woman had tried to flee three times, police said, but later that evening she took advantage of Blaylock’s absence.Blaylock had left the apartment at around 10 p.m., police said. The woman used a tablet to contact her mother, who traveled to the apartment and rescued her daughter and grandchild, police said.She visited a hospital in Brooklyn on Saturday and contacted police the next day.Lack was not aware of any missing person’s report filed in the woman’s name during the five days she was held captive.As for a motive, Lack said investigators believe the grandmother and father were interested in seeing the toddler, and that “the father was jealous of the victim having possible other relationships.” He emphasized that the investigation into their motive is in the preliminary stages.An order of protection was issued against Blaylock for an alleged assault earlier this year, Lack said. Blaylock’s criminal history is sealed. The grandmother appears to have no criminal record, Lack said.Investigators have yet to determine whose name is listed on the apartment in Hempstead where the woman and child were held for three days. Police did not release an address.Blaylock and Gilreath are both expected to be arraigned Tuesday at First District Court in Hempstead. Along with kidnapping, Blaylock was also charged with unlawful imprisonment, robbery, two counts of assault, strangulation, criminal contempt, and menacing. Gilreath was additionally charged with hindering prosecution, unlawful imprisonment, and endangering the welfare of a child.Lack told reporters that Blaylock was being investigated for potential gang ties.last_img read more


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first_imgThe virus’s outbreak came in between Australia’s academic years — which begin in February — and as many of the country’s roughly 165,000 Chinese university students had returned home for the Lunar New Year.”Our calculation is one of higher-education fee revenues only, and excludes the broader economic contribution from students to accommodation, tourism, and domestic consumption of goods and services,” S&P said in a report.Foreign students are a vital income stream for Australian universities and one that has grown exponentially in recent years.Australia is now one of the top three destinations for foreign students worldwide. The coronavirus outbreak could deliver a painful multi-billion-dollar hit to Australian universities, as high-paying Chinese students are forced to defer their studies, economists warned Thursday.Top universities stand to lose around US$2 billion (Aus$3 billion) in fees alone, according to preliminary estimates from analysts at Standard & Poor’s.Under open-ended travel restrictions imposed by the government in a bid to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, non-Australian citizens or permanent residents who have been in China since February 1 are not allowed into Australia. Student representatives told AFP that many of those students have not been able to return in time to start this semester and fear missing the whole year because of the way courses are constructed.Universities have offered to defer placements and reimburse tuition fees, but many are also trying to buy time.The University of Sydney has extended the last date students have to be on campus to March 30 — more than a month after classes were due to begin — and is trying to arrange for remote teaching.Australia’s top universities are expected to be disproportionately hit, but they should be able to absorb the blow, at least temporarily.”We believe they have some buffer in free cash, leverage, and operating margin ratios to absorb a temporary shock to revenues,” S&P said. Topics :last_img read more


first_imgINTRO: Construction of the fixed road and rail link across the Baltic between Denmark and Sweden is well on course for opening in 2000.Chris Jackson took a look at progress TRACKLAYING is getting under way on the Danish approaches to the Øresund fixed link, which is due to provide road and rail connections between Denmark and Sweden from 2000. Construction work is pushing ahead on all aspects of the international project, but the Danish landworks are furthest advanced because of the plan to extend DSB regional and inter-city services to Kastrup airport with the June 1998 timetable change.Finally authorised in June 1994, the Øresund link comprises three main elements. The Danish landworks cover 18 km of new railway from a triangular junction with DSB’s main line just west of København’s main station to a new peninsula off the coast of Amager, together with stations at Tärnby and Kastrup airport and reversing sidings for DSB domestic services. It also includes a parallel road link across Amager to connect with the existing E20 motorway heading west from the capital.The coast-to-coast section leaves Amager through a 3·7 km immersed tube tunnel under the Drogden shipping channel, avoiding any risk of bridge towers interfering with the airport approaches. The tunnel surfaces onto a 4 km long artificial island which has been built in mid-channel south of Saltholm; the island was given the name ’Peberholm’ in a recent public competition, but the title has yet to be ratified by international agreement. From here, the road and rail links climb onto a 7·8 km double-deck bridge which will include a cable-stayed central section providing a 490m span over the Flinterenden channel.The Swedish landworks start from the bridge abutment at Lernacken, 7 km south of Malmlast_img read more


first_imgIndustry body Scottish Renewables is recruiting for a new Chief Executive Officer (CEO) who would lead the organization in its efforts to advance the renewable energy sector in Scotland.The new CEO will be working closely with the Board and the staff team to ensure a positive framework to support the continued growth of renewable energy in Scotland.Scottish Renewables is a member organisation dedicated to strengthening business relationships, and exploiting Scotland’s abundant natural resources to secure a future that will deliver on jobs, investment, energy security and climate change.The new CEO will be replacing the current CEO of Scottish Renewables, Niall Stuart.Scottish Renewables noted the candidate should ideally have at least 5 years’ of demonstrable experience of leading and developing professional teams as well as managing business relationships.The deadline for applications to the position has been set for May 26, 2017.last_img read more