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first_imgCarpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard PLAY LIST 02:14Carpio hits red carpet treatment for China Coast Guard02:56NCRPO pledges to donate P3.5 million to victims of Taal eruption00:56Heavy rain brings some relief in Australia02:37Calm moments allow Taal folks some respite03:23Negosyo sa Tagaytay City, bagsak sa pag-aalboroto ng Bulkang Taal01:13Christian Standhardinger wins PBA Best Player award Ashaolu again came through with an imposing double-double performance, leading the Road Warriors to their second straight win at the expense of the North Port Batang Pier, 123-107, in the PBA Governors’ Cup at Ynares Center here on Sunday night.“My teammates, I have a great group of guys and they encourage me to play my best,” said Ashaolu after barreling his way through the paint with 27 points, 13 rebounds and three assists despite playing hurt.In the nightcap, TNT KaTropa nipped Meralco, 92-90, as both squads share second at 1-1.Nobody in the Batang Pier lineup could bottle up Ashaolu, a wide-bodied inside operator whose task is to take the attention away from a short-handed NLEX side that is still without the suspended Kiefer Ravena and the injured Kevin Alas.FEATURED STORIESSPORTSGinebra beats Meralco again to capture PBA Governors’ Cup titleSPORTSJapeth Aguilar wins 1st PBA Finals MVP award for GinebraSPORTSTim Cone still willing to coach Gilas but admits decision won’t be ‘simple yes or no’Rashad Woods and Paolo Taha drilled in long jumpers that diminished the NLEX lead to a single digit late in the fourth, but back-to-back corner threes by Kenneth Ighalo in a span of five seconds put out the North Port fire.The Road Warriors’ avalanche of threes, with Juami Tiongson and power forward JR Quiñahan doing their share, finished off the Batang Pier to secure the top spot in the season-ending conference with a 2-0 record. “Everybody’s working together for the good of the team,” said Ashaolu. “If you ask me if I’m playing on Wednesday (against Magnolia), yes I am.”After that match, Ashaolu will begin treatment for his knee. Interim coach Jojo Lastimosa said Aaron Fuller, their import in this conference last year, will take Ashaolu’s place until he fully recovers.Sports Related Videospowered by AdSparcRead Next Lights inside SMX hall flicker as Duterte rants vs Ayala, Pangilinan anew ‘High crimes and misdemeanors’: Trump impeachment trial begins Results wanted, not excuses Gov’t in no rush to rescue animals in Taal ANTIPOLO CITY—Olu Ashaolu raised eyebrows when he almost single-handedly carried NLEX to victory despite a crippling right knee cap injury.The Nigerian-Canadian behemoth, his mobility limited by a slight patellar tendon tear on his right knee, showed he’s the real deal.ADVERTISEMENT Nadine Lustre’s phone stolen in Brazil MOST READcenter_img View comments Peza offers relief to ecozone firms LATEST STORIES Palace OKs total deployment ban on Kuwait OFWs Don’t miss out on the latest news and information. Will you be the first P16 Billion Powerball jackpot winner from the Philippines? Judy Ann’s 1st project for 2020 is giving her a ‘stomachache’ DepEd’s Taal challenge: 30K students displacedlast_img read more


first_imgCreation-Evolution Headlines needs reader feedback to rank this week’s winners.  Some of these articles are so over the top, giving Darwin credit for anything and everything, it’s a wonder the Darwinists themselves don’t censor them – just to avoid public embarrassment.Evolve!  Sing Along:  New Scientist is letting you take part in the evolutionary process with music.  The headline “You have the power to make music… evolve,” is accompanied by a picture of Darwin wearing headphones.  So what’s this about?  “At DarwinTunes.org, bioinformaticist Bob MacCallum and evolutionary biologist Armand Leroi of Imperial College London have devised a way to watch music evolve right before their eyes – and in doing so study the cultural analogue of biological evolution, also known as memetics.”  So how are they going about this?  “MacCullum’s computer program creates a randomly generated pair of ‘Adam and Eve’ ‘songs’–brief loops of sound.  They mutate, recombine and reproduce to form a base population of 100 descendants.”  OK, then what? Participants act as the force of natural selection by listening to the songs and rating them, from “I love it!” through “It’s OK…” to “I can’t stand it ”.  For every 20 songs, the 10 worst rated die off, while the 10 best rated go on to reproduce at random, with each “mating” producing two new songs.  Each daughter song inherits a mixture of the parents’ computer codes, just as a biological organism inherits a mixture of its parents’ genetic codes.Their idea compares “DarwinTunes” to chromosomes, altered notes to genetic mutations, and the junction of two random tunes to mating.  It appears this entire experiment is based on analogy – similar to how Darwin used artificial selection as an analogy to natural selection.  So have some fun and sing along.  Just don’t use any intelligent design.  Maybe the results will improve on John Cage.Bombs away to photosynthesis:  Did Jeffrey Touchman (Arizona State) really mean to imply that meteorites gave rise to oxygenic photosynthesis?  If so, that sounds almost miraculous.  Photosynthesis is one of the most complex mechanisms in the living world.  Here’s how the write-up on PhysOrg liberally employed the word evolution.  Watch for the miraculous meteorites:Oxygen, one of the by-products of photosynthesis by microbes such as cyanobacteria and their descendants (including algae and higher plants), transformed the Precambrian Earth and made possible the evolution of more complex organisms.His research is focused on genome sequencing and molecular analyses of heliobacteria, proteobacteria and a cyanobacterium with the ability to shift into anoxygenic (oxygen-free) photosynthesis in the presence of sulfide, a possible evolutionary ‘missing link’ between anoxygenic and oxygenic photosynthetic organisms.“Knowing how photosynthesis originated and evolved is essential to obtaining the deep understanding required to yield improvements in bioenergy, agriculture and the environment,” Touchman says.Hidden in these organisms’ various genetic codes may be hallmarks: traces of early evolutionary innovations pointing to the origin of oxygen-evolving high-energy photosynthesis.”The arrival of oxygenic photosynthesis via transport of materials by external means, such as meteorites, could profoundly change the direction of biological evolution on a planet’s surface. The article twice employed one of science writer’s favorite stock evolutionary phrases: “‘Extreme’ genes shed light on origins of photosynthesis…. One of those actively shedding light on the origins and evolution of photosynthesis is Jeffrey Touchman, assistant professor in Arizona State University’s School of Life Sciences.”  He got $867,000 from the National Science Foundation for his light shedding.Talk to your monkey:  Scientists have uncovered the “potential existence of precursors to human language in animal vocal communication.”  A reader might wonder what “potential existence” entails – especially if it is only a precursor to a real cursor (or curser).  Does it mean something like a possible pre-possibility?  Anyhow, Science Daily trumpeted “Syntax in Our Primate Cousins.”  Certain monkeys appear to be able to combine six alert calls into sequences that provide different warnings.  “This ability to combine calls may have appeared during the monkeys’ evolution to compensate for limited vocal flexibility (monkeys have less vocal flexibility than birds and cetaceans) and provide a way to encode new messages.”  Conundrum: If there’s a way, is there a will?  If evolution provided them with a way to encode messages, did the monkeys do the encoding by intelligent design?  Or did natural selection they pay their syntax for them?No dentures allowed in carry-on baggage:  Here’s an intriguing hypothesis: “Early birds may have dropped teeth to get airborne.”  Colin Barras at New Scientist gave free rein to the speculations of Chinese scientists with a new idea of why modern birds have no teeth.  “Archaeopteryx, at 150 million years old still the oldest known bird, had an imposing set of teeth,” he said.  “But within 20 million years, at least some birds were toothless.  Now a team led by Zhonghe Zhou at the Chinese Academy of Sciences in Beijing believe they know why.”  Presumably someone can believe they know something without knowing they believe something.    Maybe a new toothless bird fossil from China can shed some light here, too: “Their analysis shows that Z. yangi belonged to one of four bird groups that independently lost their teeth, implying that this loss was no evolutionary fluke.”  The parasites known as flukes (blood flukes, liver flukes, etc.) are not what they are talking about here.  The statement seems to imply that while there might be an occasional fluke (or happenstance) of evolution, there are also events that are purposeful or intentional – an idea which, or course, runs contrary to the whole Darwinian paradigm.    Z. yangi’s group is the most primitive among them,” the article continued, “suggesting it could provide clues as to why tooth loss occurred.”  A suggestion that a clue might be forthcoming implies that there are no clues yet.  Yet without clues, it seems, there can be no answer to a “why” question based on evidence.  Enter Darwin’s mechanism to the rescue: “They think natural selection may have put pressure on weaker fliers to lose their teeth in a bid to improve their skills by losing excess weight.”  A curious reader might wonder if birds bid on auctions or go to self-improvement classes.  An ornithology-astute reader also might wonder if the presence of gizzard stones makes this a zero-sum game for the bird, which must have compensated for the lack of teeth with additional digestive system modifications.    Reporter Colin Barras did redeem himself somewhat by quoting a lone skeptical voice: “That theory is ‘as good as any other’, says Mike Benton at the University of Bristol, UK, though he remains sceptical.  ‘Losing teeth wouldn’t make a huge difference to balance in the air.’” If one theory is as good as any other, is it also as bad as any other?  That would seem the only logical possibility in a set of theories lacking any ranking of good or bad.The emptiness of evolutionary speculation approaches a vacuum.  We should abhor this vacuum.  With no evidence at all, their belief in evolution is allowed to substitute for evidence.  A gushy media with no guts to challenge fact-free speculation plays into the hands of belief masquerading as science, imagination masquerading as knowledge.  They’re shedding light on evolution, all right (shed., verb: to discard, abandon, cast off).  They walk in darkness, the blind leading the blind into the ditch, bragging about all the light Darwin gave them.(Visited 17 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_img12 December 2011 South Africa had on several occasions appealed to China to halt the execution of Janice Linden, a South African woman convicted of smuggling drugs. On Monday morning, South Africans woke up to the news that Janice Bronwyn Linden was being executed in China. The 37-year-old woman from KwaZulu-Natal was arrested in November 2008 after being found in possession of 3kg of methamphetamines when she arrived in Guangzhou. International Relations and Cooperation spokesperson Clayson Monyela said the South African authorities had been in constant contact with the Chinese on Linden’s sentence, appealing for her execution to be halted. “We have tried at the level of the ambassador in Beijing, up to the level of government, to try to appeal to the authorities in China to commute or convert the sentence from a death penalty to a jail term, especially given what our Constitution says about the death penalty,” Monyela said on Monday. “Unfortunately, all our terms were unsuccessful.” Monyela told E-News channel in an interview that they had even pleaded with the Chinese delegation on the sidelines of the UN climate summit (COP 17) held in Durban over the last two weeks, but this had not yielded any positive results. “We are disappointed in this morning’s execution,” said Monyela. According to Chinese practice, Linden would not have been told of her execution until this morning (Chinese time). Media reports suggested that two of her sisters were in China and had been allowed an hour with her before she was put to death by lethal injection. Monyela said the department would continue providing consular services to her family. Although it is not known how many people are executed in China annually, because the information is classified as a “national secret”, Linden is the first South African to be executed in China, and human rights groups say thousands still face capital punishment in that country. Source: BuaNewslast_img read more


first_imgThe Fortune 500. Large companies have long been the target for software companies. The contracts were big and so usually were the margins. But that’s no longer the thinking. Vendors have moved their focus to SMBs, companies with between 200 and 2000 employees:Headline: SMBs will be IBMs Biggest Market in Five Years.Headline: Oracle Revs Up Battle for Mid-Market Applications CustomersArticle: …HP and its rivals, which include IBM and EMC, believe the SMB market offers the best prospects for new customers…Article: …Embrace Small and Midsize Business: Microsoft remains the SMB king…Gartner estimates that the 80 million small and midsize companies in the US will spend $450 billion in 2007. In the first quarter of 2007, IBM had $4.1 billion in SMB sales compared to $6 billion in financial services, their biggest vertical. Soon the SMB market will become IBM’s largest.IDC reports that IT spending for SMBs will grow 8 percent in 2007, but the report notes that not all vendors are correctly packaging their software to sieze the opportunity. Many software vendors strip out features and lower prices to address the small to mid-market.IDC reports rather than stripping features software targeting SBMs needs to be simplified or made easier to use, something that can often requires greater effort than creating the software and services bundle typically sold to large enterprises.SaaS is one trend in IT that seems to be a perfect match for SMBs budgets and resources. Yet the IDC report found that only two percent of SMB respondents are using SaaS.last_img read more