Call: 0123456789 | Email: info@example.com

Tag: 后海湾休闲会所


first_imgPaleoanthropologists have a major conundrum on their hands, or feet.  EurekAlert reported about controversial footprints found in Mexico ash deposits that had been thought to be 44,000 years old.  Even that was too old for many to swallow, but new argon-argon dates show them to be 1.3 million years old – far older than those in Africa, where the first modern humans were supposed to come from.  Either the dates are not trustworthy, or these are not footprints.  No resolution to this anomaly seems satisfactory at the moment.  Pictures and additional information can be found at BBC News, National Geographic News, and News@Nature.  A reader found web pages of the discoverers at MexicanFootprints.com and Bournemouth University, UK.  Renne et al. in Nature1 are taking the view they are not footprints, even though toes and heelprints appear in some of them.1Renne et al., “Geochronology: Age of Mexican ash with alleged ‘footprints’, Nature 438, E7-E8 (1 December 2005) | doi:10.1038/nature04425.This will be a good test of the scientific values of the Darwinists.  They always claim to be skeptical of any finding, never taking anything on “faith” like those religious-right fundies.  OK, Darwinists, you’ve got a problem.  Show us some rationality and objectivity.  We seem to recall that creationists quickly withdrew claims of Paluxy human tracks on the first hint of a problem with the data, and have been very cautious ever since.  In their case, however, the find was not a necessary piece of evidence, just a tantalizing one.  In this case, if humans or advanced hominids were in Mexico over a million years before the famed “out of Africa” story, there is a lot of Darwinian storytelling at risk of unraveling.  Either evolutionists cannot trust their fossil skills, or their dating methods (see 11/05/2005), or both.  What would it take to falsify human evolution?  If nothing – no amount of contrary evidence or logic – could ever dislodge the idea that humans slowly emerged from primitive ancestors, then your critics are going to stick a note on the seat of your pants: “Kick me; I’m a fighting fundamentalist.”(Visited 14 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more


first_imgThe broadcasting deal will take the2010 Fifa World Cup matches straight fromthe pitch to the homes of millions ofAfricans.(Image: Chris Kirchhoff,MediaClubSouthAfrica.com. For more freephotos, visit the image library) All countries across sub Saharan Africawill benefit from the 2010 Fifa broadcast deal.(Image: Wikimedia) Tamara O’ReillyAn agreement by football governing body Fifa and the African Union of Broadcasters (AUB) will see to it that the 2010 World Cup reaches viewers across sub-Saharan Africa.All 64 of the tournament’s matches will be broadcast live on free-to-air television and radio in 41 regions in Africa in English, French and Portuguese. Fifa selected the AUB as the partner for sub-Saharan Africa based on its capacity to reach the largest possible audience.AUB is a combination of the Pan-African Broadcasting and Union of National Radio and Television Organisation of Africa, formed in 2007 to develop all facets of broadcasting on the continent.“The AUB has shown considerable strengths in uniting broadcasters under one umbrella to ensure that all sub-Saharan Africans will be able to have access to the radio and TV coverage of and around the 2010 Fifa World Cup,” said Fifa president Sepp Blatter.“We always promised that 2010 would be an African World Cup, and with today’s cooperation agreement we have made a big step towards achieving this goal.”An African production centre will be established at the International Broadcast Centre (IBC) in Johannesburg during the 2010 event to ensure high-quality coverage for African viewers.The IBC, the communication nucleus of the 2010 Fifa World Cup, is under construction at the Nasrec Exhibition Centre in the south of Johannesburg. Nasrec is one of the oldest and largest exhibition centres in Johannesburg. More than R120-million (US$12-million) is being spent on the upgrading and installations that will be required by the 15 000 media personnel and commentators who will descend on the city for six weeks during June and July 2010.Johannesburg is already the primary broadcasting hub for international and local television and radio, as well as home to almost 60% of all information, communication and technology businesses in South Africa.“For us at AUB the deal was a dream come true for it accords with the goals of our Union for sustainability and will facilitate the achievement of one of the goals we adopted as legacies for Africa from the 2010 Fifa World Cup in South Africa, namely capacity development of broadcasting in Africa,” said Lawrence Atiase, CEO of the AUB.“We are fully committed to playing our part and we thank Fifa for placing their trust in the AUB’s ability to deliver.”The move is also being welcomed by several African countries who cannot afford to pay the high prices for broadcast rights of such tournaments. Kenya, for example, who has in the past broadcast live tournaments like the African Cup of Nations and the Olympic Games to the Kenyan public, did so at considerable costs.“We welcome this move by Fifa,” says Kenya Broadcasting Corporation managing director David Waweru. “It will be easier to negotiate with AUB, who will sell at more affordable and realistic fees than third parties. We are now sure we, as the national broadcaster, will bring the 2010 World Cup to Kenyans.”The previous Fifa World Cup, held in Germany 2006, was the most extensive in the tournament’s history. Compared to the 2002 tournament, which was covered by 232 channels worldwide, the 2006 event was broadcast by 376 channels reaching 24.2-billion viewers globally.According to the Fifa website, the 2006 event was aired in a total 43 600 broadcasts across 214 countries generating total coverage of 73 072 hours. This means that if all the 2006 coverage were shown on just one channel, it would take over eight years to broadcast non-stop.Host of the next Fifa World Cup, South Africa, enjoyed more 2006 Fifa World Cup Germany coverage than any other African market, with the cable network, SuperSport, showing a total of 1 627 hours of coverage on its five channels.Do you have any comments or queries about this article? Email Tamara O’Reilly at tamarao@mediaclubsouthafrica.com.Related articlesMeet Zakumi, the 2010 mascot Fifa World Cup host cities 2010 media hub at Nasrec Useful linksFifaAfrican Union of Broadcastinglast_img read more


first_imgWe reached out to the Cache Owner mrradach to interview them about geocaching, creating awesome geocaches, and many other fun questions. We will release the full interview this Friday on the Geocaching blog. An excerpt: HQ: Do you have a favorite hide of your own?mrradach: Every one of them is my favorite (laughs). But if I highlighted one, that would be Chuchichäschtli Deluxe (GC6MZEJ). Not only was the production a lot of fun, but also naming it was fun. I found a good way to involve the community because they voted on what the name should be. I’d like to help inspire other cachers to create high quality, well thought out caches.Continue to explore some of the most amazing geocaches around the world.Check out all of the Geocaches of the Week on the Geocaching blog. If you would like to nominate a Geocache of the Week, fill out this form.Share with your Friends:More TraditionalGC6MZEJby mrradach Basel Stadt,SwitzerlandN 47° 34.159′ E 007° 39.480′ 3.5Terrain:2.5 Difficulty: The first step is to unlock the padlock from the outside.It consists of  three numbers and it is up to you to figure where to look for them. The next step is to conquer the metal maze designed to challenge those who believe they are worthy of logging this cache. Navigate the chain-linked game piece through the twists and turns of the maze to open up the next stage. Two smaller doors with no indication of how they open is the final hurdle to this creative cache. The only hint we can provide is that they may (or may not) work in conjunction with one another. Welcome to Chuchichäschtli Deluxe! Did you pronounce that correctly? If not, don’t worry you’re not alone — trying to pronounce the name of this geocache is almost as puzzling as the cache itself. Swiss-German (Schweizerdeutsch) speakers can say this expression with ease, but we won’t keep the door shut on the translation. It is the typical Swiss-German term for kitchen cupboard, although this isn’t your typical cupboard (unless you like to store things in the woods). Opening the first door presents a big challenge, a labyrinth that is more deceptive than meets the eye.  Nestled into a wooded area about 7 km (4 mi) from the busy streets of Basel City’s beautiful downtown district, and a five-minute walk from the German border, you’ll find ‘Chuchichaschtli Deluxe.’ Meandering hiking trails intertwine through the little forest with a few other geocaches scattered about. Finding GC6MZEJ is not very difficult, only opening it is. As mentioned before, you’re looking for something similar to a cupboard in the woods, painted brown on the outside, on a staff, and tucked away behind a tree. SharePrint RelatedBasel 1 GCG95Z GEOCACHE OF THE WEEK – April 9, 2012April 9, 2012In “Community”Planes, trains and epic hikes — Rund um den Gelmersee (GC32DQT) — Geocache of the WeekMay 14, 2014In “Community”Walensee 8° — Geocache of the WeekAugust 7, 2019In “Community”last_img read more