Call: 0123456789 | Email: info@example.com

Month: October 2020


first_imgCategories: Letters to the Editor, OpinionImpeachment being trivialized by DemsI cannot sit idly by as the “impeachment” process unfolds. It’s a mockery of the word.Having taught social science for 38 years, I made sure time was devoted to the government section, focusing on Articles I, II and III.Article I gave the House of Representatives sole power to impeach.I emphasized that a violation of the Constitution had to be severe and not an ordinary act.To do otherwise would trivialize its meaning.Today the Democrats are doing just that. It’s a partisan, political process.The Democrats still cannot get over the fact that they lost to Donald Trump.Within hours of their losing, it has been a witch hunt. As a registered Democrat, I’m bothered by such a lackluster grouping of candidates who want to be president.Rep. Greene from Texas said, “We must impeach him or else we will lose the election.”Rep. Nadler was overheard saying “We will impeach him.” Again, this was just after Trump was elected.What do we Americans get? A rigged House Intelligence Committee, and here they are imploring the Senate to guarantee the Democrats a fair trial.Is there a resolution to all this finger-pointing nonsense?Attorney General Barr is readying a full report relating to the chicanery in the FBI and Judicial Department.I hope he will give us answers and restore our faith in government. We deserve it.Donald Trump makes me wince on occasion on what he says and does, but impeachment? No way.Jerry BubniakNorthvilleTrump is hardly decent, fair, honestReferring to Mr. Knuth’s Dec. 22 letter (“Republicans: Stop defending Trump”) with his assertion that Donald Trump is honest, decent and fair, I would like to point out a few of the instances where his actions or statements prove the exact opposite.Before elaborating, I must state that the majority, not all, of Trump supporters, in my opinion, fall into one of three categories: ill-informed (relying on one news outlet, see Fox), wealthy (note tax cuts benefiting corporate America and the ultra-rich, although I myself have benefited to a degree), or just not interested in ascertaining fact from fiction.As far as “honesty” is concerned, a few facts: the Trump Foundation shut down for inappropriate use of funds, followed by a government fine of $2 million; Trump University defunct while settling three lawsuits for $25 million; lying about the size of his inauguration attendance … Need I go on?Decency: Disparaging Sen. John McCain, a true American hero. Oh, if it were not for bone spurs, Trump might have become an American hero – not.Cheating on his third wife with a porn actress, shortly after the birth of his son.How honest is that?Fairness: Separating children from parents at the border.At least he can put some of the blame on his white supremacist aide Stephen Miller.Jim BrodieSchenectadyMore from The Daily Gazette:EDITORIAL: Urgent: Today is the last day to complete the censusEDITORIAL: Find a way to get family members into nursing homesEDITORIAL: Beware of voter intimidationFoss: Should main downtown branch of the Schenectady County Public Library reopen?Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s press conference for Sunday, Oct. 18last_img read more


first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img


first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img


first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img


first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img


first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img


first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img


first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img


first_imgWould you like to read more?Register for free to finish this article.Sign up now for the following benefits:Four FREE articles of your choice per monthBreaking news, comment and analysis from industry experts as it happensChoose from our portfolio of email newsletters To access this article REGISTER NOWWould you like print copies, app and digital replica access too? SUBSCRIBE for as little as £5 per week.last_img


first_imgThe virus’s outbreak came in between Australia’s academic years — which begin in February — and as many of the country’s roughly 165,000 Chinese university students had returned home for the Lunar New Year.”Our calculation is one of higher-education fee revenues only, and excludes the broader economic contribution from students to accommodation, tourism, and domestic consumption of goods and services,” S&P said in a report.Foreign students are a vital income stream for Australian universities and one that has grown exponentially in recent years.Australia is now one of the top three destinations for foreign students worldwide. The coronavirus outbreak could deliver a painful multi-billion-dollar hit to Australian universities, as high-paying Chinese students are forced to defer their studies, economists warned Thursday.Top universities stand to lose around US$2 billion (Aus$3 billion) in fees alone, according to preliminary estimates from analysts at Standard & Poor’s.Under open-ended travel restrictions imposed by the government in a bid to prevent the spread of the coronavirus, non-Australian citizens or permanent residents who have been in China since February 1 are not allowed into Australia. Student representatives told AFP that many of those students have not been able to return in time to start this semester and fear missing the whole year because of the way courses are constructed.Universities have offered to defer placements and reimburse tuition fees, but many are also trying to buy time.The University of Sydney has extended the last date students have to be on campus to March 30 — more than a month after classes were due to begin — and is trying to arrange for remote teaching.Australia’s top universities are expected to be disproportionately hit, but they should be able to absorb the blow, at least temporarily.”We believe they have some buffer in free cash, leverage, and operating margin ratios to absorb a temporary shock to revenues,” S&P said. Topics :last_img read more